ANTIQUE HEART

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The voice is at the very core of Antique Heart’s subtle, delicate compositions. Tracks that at times flame up and expand into dramatic musical spheres. Dreamy piano chords and moody guitars set the tone for this band ‘s sonic realm, in which they tells us stories of being captivated by a desire which is bigger than life itself while watching the sky, getting lost in nature’s magical land scapes, and dissolving into sunrays after leaving this earth. They invite the listener to follow them down into this wonderland , deeper and deeper, until a gentle sound wakes them from this dream – only to sink in again..

FACTS:

1: Turn destruction into creation.
2: Don’t forget to watch the leaves grow.
3: I wasn’t prepared for this.

QUESTIONS:

1. What is the biggest inspiration for your music?

I’m busy getting around what’s going on in my head, so I’m not looking for inspiration outside of myself that much. More generally speaking, I’m going for the existential stuff, thoughts about life, death, how nature moves me. I’m not into lovesongs or writing about everyday topics.

2. How and when did you get into making music?

As a child, I would save up all my pocket money for when my mom and I would go to Poland to visit the family and spend hours choosing tapes from the black market stand s around town. I was in heaven. At home, it usually took me months to save up 35 Deutschmarks for one record. This obsession of buying and listening to records somehow naturally turned into writing songs when I was a teenager.

3. What are 5 of your favourite albums of all time?

I would have too much to say about 5, so let me name three. All in all, my favourite would be „Boys for Pele“ by Tori Amos, released in 1996. Back then, I was too young to understand what she is talking about lyricwise, but I could feel her passion and her anger through her music, and I was very aware that it was way more special and honest than what I would hear on the radio.
I also love „Bavarian Fruit Bread“ by Hope Sand oval & The Warm Inventions. Nobody celebrates deceleration as beautifully as she does. And „Nevermind“ had a big impact on me too. I’m sure very many musicians name that record, and I’m actually happy to be part of that group or generation or whatever.

4. What do you associate with Berlin?

Even though Berlin has changed a lot in the last few years, I still think this is the best place to live a free life. Assuming you want to live in a big city in Europe, of course. At the moment, I’m a lot more drawn to what you can find around Berlin than to the city itsself. Lakes, rivers, forests, Brand enburg has so many magical places to offer, you just have to go and find them.

5. What’s your favourite place in your town?

Places with great music. I love 8MM Bar. Always a good selection of psychedelic and garage tunes there.

6. If there was no music in the world, what would you do instead?

I guess I would work in some kind of park. I would be a park ranger, cruising around in my jeep. Looking out for my bears and owls. Yeah, I would love that.

7. What was the last record/music you bought?

Oum Shatt or Fenster, not sure.

8. Who would you most like to collaborate with?

I love Agnes Obel and Sóley. And Tame Impala. I would die happy :)

9. What was your best gig (as performer or spectator)?

I saw Pete Doherty at White Trash one or two years ago. Such a lovely personality, so genuine, and open in a way that must make him vulnerable. The way he engaged with the audience, I can’t even really describe it. He just made me feel as if we had been best friends for a long time. I felt warm and happy inside for the next two days.

10. How important is technology to your creative process?

Not important. All I want at the moment is to feel the vibrations in my body when I’m rehearsing with my cellist. That kind of stuff.

11. Do you have siblings and how do they feel about your career/art?

Nope, but I have a cousin who is a singer-songwriter too. We haven’t really been in touch since we were children, but I went to visit her a year ago. Turned out we both write and sing, wear black and have the same sense of humour.

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